Sugary Drinks and Trans Fats Increase Risk of Death From Fatty Liver Disease
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Diets that are rich in sugary beverages and trans fatty acids but lack the more healthful components of a Mediterranean diet drive up the risk of death from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to findings presented at The Liver Meeting Digital Experience. Arising from the accumulation of fat in the liver, NAFLD and its more severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), are responsible for a growing proportion of advanced liver disease worldwide. The researchers set out to determine the connection between metabolic and diet-related risk factors and death from liver disease. Globally, there were 184,905 liver-related deaths due to NAFLD in 2017, accounting for 8.6% of liver deaths due to all chronic liver diseases combined. High consumption of trans fats led to an almost 3% rise in such deaths even after adjusting for metabolic risk factors.

Five Goals of the New National Plan to End Viral Hepatitis
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The viruses are spread differently, ranging from contaminated food and water (like hepatitis A) to blood transfusions and shared needles (hepatitis C). The plan lists five main goals for the next five years:Prevent new viral hepatitis infections. Improve viral hepatitis–related health outcomes of people with viral hepatitis. “The nation is losing ground in the fight against viral hepatitis despite safe and effective hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines, and a hepatitis C cure that works after an eight-week course of medicine.”The AIDS Institute, a national nonprofit, said the new plan lays the groundwork for eliminating hepatitis. People living with HIV often have problems that affect the liver, including viral hepatitis and fatty liver.

Hip-Hop Mogul Dr. Dre Recovering After a Brain Aneurysm
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After recently making headlines for his ongoing divorce battle, Dr. Dre, age 55, is in the news again. The hip-hop artist and producer was hospitalized January 4 for a brain aneurysm, reports NBC News. A brain aneurysm is a bulge, or ballooning, in a blood vessel in the brain that can leak or rupture, leading to bleeding in the brain, better known as a hemorrhagic stroke. It’s unknown whether Dre’s brain aneurysm did, in fact, rupture. “Send love and your prayers to the homie Dr. Dre,” tweeted Ice Cube, who, along with Dre, was a member of the rap group N.W.A.

New Test Locates Prostate Cancer’s Spread
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Thirty years in the making, the test may soon improve prostate cancer treatment. In any given year, 174,600 men in the United States will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 31,600 will die of it. By making prostate cancer cells beam on a PET scan, the new test identifies whether metastasis has occurred and if so, where. In the 1990s, cancer researchers found that prostate cancer cells express a distinct protein on their surfaces that can be detected by small molecules. To learn more about this test, read “PSMA PET-CT Accurately Detects Prostate Cancer Spread, Trial Shows.” And to read about another innovation in prostate cancer treatment, see “Minimally Invasive Ultrasound Ablation Can Treat Prostate Cancer.”

Former FDA Leader With HIV Background to Spearhead COVID-19 Efforts
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During his tenure, Kessler oversaw FDA efforts to speed the development and approval of antivirals to treat HIV, notably a class of meds known as protease inhibitors. .⁦@DavidAKesslerMD⁩ gets picked to run Operation Warp Speed. This is a smart choice.”At the FDA, Kessler worked alongside Anthony Fauci, MD, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, to develop HIV meds. They made the case that the United States should launch a program to supply the world with COVID-19 vaccines, similar to what the nation did with HIV meds. For a collection of articles in POZ on the intersection of COVID-19 and HIV, click #COVID-19.

Why Are More Black Americans Left Off Liver Transplant Waiting Lists?
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For the study, researchers reviewed deceased donor liver transplant and waiting list data for 109 high-volume liver transplant centers. This contrast showed that 4.4% of Black patients were disproportionately left off liver transplant waiting lists, compared with other racial groups. Only 2.5% of other racial/ethnic groups were left off the waiting lists. When researchers looked at actual liver transplant surgeries, the disparities shifted slightly. (If individuals knew sooner rather than later about this option, doctors could inform patients about the requirements for placement on liver transplant waiting lists.)

FDA Approves Cabenuva, the First Complete Long-Acting Injectable HIV Treatment
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On January 21, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first complete injectable HIV treatment regimen that does not require daily pills. They were randomly assigned to either stay on their current oral regimen or switch to Cabenuva injections after an oral lead-in. Reasons included greater convenience, having to think about HIV treatment only 12 times a year and not having pill bottles that could reveal their HIV status to others. Once-monthly Cabenuva for HIV treatment was first approved in Canada in March 2020. “Cabenuva once-monthly injections showed comparable efficacy to daily oral antiretroviral treatment in maintaining viral suppression—a first in the treatment paradigm.”Click here for full prescribing information for Cabenuva.

People Over 65 Are Now Eligible for the COVID-19 Vaccine—If They Can Get It
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He added that the government would release all remaining vaccine doses it was holding, after President-elect Joe Biden vowed to do the same when he takes office. Many people who received their first dose soon after the vaccines were authorized in mid-December have now had their second dose. Some experts urged prioritization of older people, who are at much higher risk for severe COVID-19 and death. The CDC’s list of conditions that increase COVID-19 risk includes obesity, smoking, diabetes, cancer, compromised immunity and chronic heart, kidney or lung disease. Can the Second Dose Be Delayed?

A Reluctant Meditator Takes A Weeklong Trip With Jeff Warren — Calm Blog
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For most of my life, I viewed meditation as a repetitive, burdensome practice designed for the devoutly spiritual—or the culturally refined. It wasn’t until I stumbled upon Jeff’s How to Meditate series that I discovered how accessible and exhilarating mindfulness could be. When I heard Jeff was launching a daily meditation series called The Daily Trip, I was elated. I’ve managed a walking meditation here, and a soundscape meditation there, but never settled into a consistent routine. So, I decided to put my new meditation cushion to the test, and experience The Daily Trip every single day for a week.

Taking a Closer Look at COVID-19’s Effects on the Brain
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Taking a Closer Look at COVID-19’s Effects on the BrainPosted on January 14th, 2021 by Dr. Francis CollinsCaption: Magnetic resonance microscopy showing lower part of a COVID-19 patient’s brain stem postmortem. Credit: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIHWhile primarily a respiratory disease, COVID-19 can also lead to neurological problems. The NIH team, led by Avindra Nath, used a high-powered magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner (up to 10 times as sensitive as a typical MRI) to examine postmortem brain tissue from 19 patients. They could find no evidence in the brain tissue samples that SARS-CoV-2 had invaded the brain tissue. Links:COVID-19 Research (NIH)Avindra Nath (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/NIH)NIH Support: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; National Institute on Aging; National Institute of General Medical Sciences; National Cancer Institute; National Institute of Mental Health

Making Personalized Blood-Brain Barriers in a Dish
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Making Personalized Blood-Brain Barriers in a DishPosted on June 27th, 2019 by Dr. Francis CollinsCredit: Vatine et al, Cell Stem Cell, 2019The blood-brain barrier, or BBB, is a dense sheet of cells that surrounds most of the brain’s blood vessels. To help look for solutions to these and other problems, researchers can now grow human blood-brain barriers on a chip like the one pictured above. In close association are supportive brain cells known as astrocytes (green), which help to regulate blood flow. The BBB chips also show electrical resistance and permeability just as would be expected in a person. Reference:[1] Human iPSC-Derived Blood-Brain Barrier Chips Enable Disease Modeling and Personalized Medicine Applications.

Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee December 10, 2020 Meeting Announcement - 12/10/2020 - 12/10/2020
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On This Page Meeting InformationEvent MaterialsDate: Time:Please note that due to the impact of this COVID-19 pandemic, all meeting participants will be joining this advisory committee meeting via an online teleconferencing platform. Materials for this meeting will be available at the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meetings main page. The meeting will include slide presentations with audio components to allow the presentation of materials in a manner that most closely resembles an in-person advisory committee meeting. Webcast InformationCBER plans to provide a free of charge, live webcast of the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meeting. A notice in the Federal Register about last minute modifications that impact a previously announced advisory committee meeting cannot always be published quickly enough to provide timely notice.

Exercise Releases Brain-Healthy Protein
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Exercise Releases Brain-Healthy ProteinPosted on June 28th, 2016 by Dr. Francis CollinsWe all know that exercise is important for a strong and healthy body. In mice, brain cells treated with the protein also exhibited molecular changes associated with the production of new neurons. The team set out to find proteins that muscle cells secrete during exercise that could be transported to the brain [2]. Sure enough, the study showed a significant increase in blood cathepsin B levels with regular fitness training. And yet, compounds that elevate cathepsin B levels in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease have been neuroprotective [6].

More Progress Toward Gene Editing for Kids with Muscular Dystrophy
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More Progress Toward Gene Editing for Kids with Muscular DystrophyPosted on February 26th, 2019 by Dr. Francis CollinsCaption: Muscles of untreated mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (left) compared to muscles of similar mice one year after gene-editing treatment (right). This “in vivo” approach to gene editing successfully restored production of functional dystrophin proteins, strengthening animals’ muscles within weeks of treatment. It’s important to emphasize that this gene editing research aimed at curing DMD is being done in non-reproductive (somatic) cells, primarily muscle tissue. The NIH does not support the use of gene editing technologies in human embryos or human reproductive (germline) cells, which would change the genetic makeup of future offspring. As such, the Duke researchers’ CRISPR/Cas9 system is designed to work optimally in a range of muscle and muscle-progenitor cells.

A Close-up of COVID-19 in Lung Cells
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This image offers a striking example of exactly what happens to cells in the human airway when this coronavirus infects them. This colorized scanning electron microscope (SEM) image shows SARS-CoV-2-infected human lung cells (purple) covered in hair-like cilia (blue). Emerging from the surface of those infected airway cells are many thousands of coronavirus particles (red). They first cultured cells from the lining of a human airway, then inoculated them with the virus. The image illustrates the astoundingly large number of viral particles that can be produced and released from infected human cells.

Why the Capitol Attack Makes Holocaust Remembrance Day Vital
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To scholars of the history of anti-Semitism and Holocaust history, however, the anti-Semitism on display was shocking, but not new. More than 75 years after the end of World War II, the Jan. 6 Capitol Hill attack became the latest reminder of how Nazi ideas still endure. What is the significance of the Jan. 6 insurrection on Capitol Hill as we approach International Holocaust Remembrance Day? This is why we need a Holocaust Remembrance Day because these battles are constantly being waged over and over again. They went off to [World War II] simply because Japan bombed us.

Understanding Your Treatment Options for Uterine Fibroids
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Most doctors suggest that women with uterine fibroids (also known as leiomyomas or myomas) get regular checkups to monitor any changes to these noncancerous growths. For those who experience severe symptoms, however, treatment options range from medication to surgery. Each woman is different, and uterine fibroids affect individuals in different ways. If periods are painful because of fibroids, women might be advised to use over-the-counter painkillers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Laparoscopic myomectomy removes fibroids through a small incision below the abdomen and usually requires two to seven days of recovery.

Watch Jill Biden Talk Cancer and COVID-19 at an HIV and LGBTQ Clinic
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Two days after the presidential inauguration, First Lady Jill Biden shone the national spotlight on cancer prevention and COVID-19 by discussing health care issues as she toured one of the sites of Whitman-Walker Health, which provides wellness and health services to the LGBTQ and HIV communities in Washington, DC. Biden was joined by Naseema Shafi, the CEO of Whitman-Walker Health, and Kim Thiboldeaux, the CEO of Cancer Support Community. 1 priority at this moment.”Why tour an LGBTQ-focused health clinic to discuss cancer and COVID-19? Each year, Whitman-Walker Health provides about 12,000 cancer screenings—including on-site colonoscopies, which results in fewer referrals, Shafi said. Whitman-Walker Health, through its several DC locations, aims to “provide stigma-free care to anyone who walks through our doors.

Uterine Fibroids Symptoms
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Uterine fibroids are benign (noncancerous) growths or tumors found in the uterus. The cause of uterine fibroids is unknown, but family history is a risk factor for their development. The presence of high levels of hormones—as are seen during pregnancy—helps fibroids grow bigger. African-American women are more often affected by fibroids; additionally, in Black women, fibroids tend to appear at a younger age and grow more quickly. Because women may lack symptoms, uterine fibroids are often discovered during a routine gynecological pelvic exam or through image studies.

Don’t Let a Doctor Tell You “It’s Just Your Hormones”
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“I don’t have any children, so I asked questions because nobody had ever mentioned fibroids to me before,” she says. He told Abudeye that having fibroids would make it harder to give birth. “But no one in my family, even distant family, had fibroids,” Abudeye says. Abudeye considered her options and chose to go on birth control, one way her doctor said she could manage the condition. As a result of her initial experience years ago with her general practitioner, Abudeye doesn’t automatically accept what a doctor says.

About Us

At Wellness Axis we want to encourage habits of wellness, Increase awareness of factors and resources contributing to well-being, Inspire and empower individuals to take responsibility for their own health, and to support a sense of community. Wellness can be thought of as the quality or state of being in good health.

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