Women Have Stronger Side Effects to COVID-19 Vaccines

Women Have Stronger Side Effects to COVID-19 Vaccines

MCKINSEY JORDAN/Stocksy Researchers at the CDC say women tend to have stronger side effects to COVID-19 vaccines than men. Frontline workers Shelly and Scott Blomgren were among the first people in the United States to get the COVID-19 vaccine in January. In fact, 79 percent of side effects reported came from women, although only 61 percent of the vaccines were given to women. Experts suspect that in women, particularly premenopausal women, the levels of estrogen help activate the immune response to illness and, therefore, to vaccines. “In women, there is an exuberant and stronger response [to many vaccines],” he told Healthline.

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