Black Women Turn to Midwives to Avoid COVID and ‘Feel Cared For’

Black Women Turn to Midwives to Avoid COVID and ‘Feel Cared For’

And she wanted a Black midwife. “Every midwife I’m talking to has seen their practice double or sometimes triple in the wake of COVID,” said Jamarah Amani, a Florida midwife and co-founder of the National Black Midwives Alliance. At least three Black women have died in childbirth since March in New York City, which was hit hard early on by the coronavirus. In certain rural pockets, Black midwives continued to deliver babies for poor Black and white families alike, even into the last century, as modern obstetrics regulated traditional birth attendants virtually out of existence. Camara said she wanted to support them: She’s had supportive, competent white birth attendants in the past, “but it wasn’t the same,” she said.

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